• Everything takes longer than you think! It took some time to get our project application completed and then to get it through the technical appraisal.  One of the difficulties was the need to get three quotes from competent contractors.
  • We tried to ensure we got the best advice about this type of technology, but the number of experts with relevant experience is quite limited. Be prepared to change your approach as better ways of doing things can become available.
  • Make sure you have a good understanding of:
    • the needs of your visitors
    • what you want to achieve
    • what can and cannot be delivered through the chosen technology
    • the gaps in your knowledge
    • the practical, technical and intellectual and human resources you will need.
  • Communication with contractors can be frustrating at times, especially if you are unsure what issues you need to address or what questions to ask. During development all sorts of barriers and constraints became apparent and we had to resolve these as we went along. A longer period to develop an action plan with the contractor would have been extremely useful, but the procurement rules of our funders did not allow for such development work to take place.
  • You can’t take access to Broadband and the speed of the internet connection for granted in remote rural locations.  Further investments were necessary to make the internet connection sufficiently robust to be able to update the I-Glass unit remotely.
  • It is important to coordinate the people responsible for delivering different aspects of a project – in our case software developers and building contractors.  Regular meetings were essential.